Northern Parula at Col. Sam Smith Park: September 2021

Here is what A. C. Bent wrote about the Northern Parula in “Life Histories of North American Wood Warblers” (1953).

It creeps along the branches and hops from twig to twig, often clinging to the underside of a cluster like a chickadee, an action that led some of the early writers to refer to it as a small titmouse.

In fact, the name Parula means little titmouse or chickadee.

I was able to take these photographs of one at Col. Sam Smith Park showing the bird in fall plumage.

Northern Parula
Northern Parula
Northern Parula
Northern Parula
Northern Parula
Northern Parula
Northern Parula
Northern Parula
Northern Parula
Northern Parula
Northern Parula
Northern Parula
Northern Parula

MYSTERY BIRD

This is a tough one as the photo does not show the complete head. I will identify it at the end of the post.

Other birds:

Yellow-crowned Night Heron (juvenile)
American Redstart (juvenile)
Mallard
Double-crested Cormorants
Mallard
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Mallard
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Ring-billed Gull
Great Blue Heron
Great Crested Flycatcher
Mute Swans
Mallard
Red-necked Grebe
Yellow-crowned Night Heron (juvenile)
Double-crested Cormorants
Black-crowned Night Heron
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Ring-billed Gull (juvenile)
American Redstart (juvenile)
Great Blue Heron
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Great Crested Flycatcher
Mallards
Rock Pigeons
American Redstart (juvenile)
Black-crowned Night Heron

Other life:

Twelve-spotted Skimmer
Red Squirrel
Red-eared Slider
Red-eared Sliders

MYSTERY BIRD

The white wing bars, yellow belly and black stripes identify a Magnolia Warbler.

Magnolia Warbler

NATURE POETRY

Sweet melody amidst the moving spheres
Breaks forth, a solemn and entrancing sound,
A harmony whereof the earth’s green hills
Give but the faintest echo; yet is there. – Bessie Parkes

Miles Hearn

6 thoughts on “Northern Parula at Col. Sam Smith Park: September 2021

  1. William Rosenfeld

    Absolutely phenomenal! The brilliant photographs of species so rarely seen brings delight in these troubled times. I cannot thank you enough.

    Reply
  2. Lisa Volkov

    So–which was the cutest? The Red Squirrel, the Ball Bearing Water Pooch, or the Red-eared Slider? Hard to decide!
    Wonderful pictures. Thanks, Miles!

    Reply
  3. Ian Valentine

    Thanks for all your posts, Miles. I tried to get into the fall course offerings but came up short as the wheel kept on spinning and when I retried the courses were all full. Disappointing but maybe winter if you are doing them. Are you sure that the bird identified as a Green Heron is not actually a juvenile Yellow-crowned Night-Heron?

    Reply
  4. rosemarie fischer

    stunning photos,one more beautiful then the other…..and so many varieties,so happy you’re sharing these with us!!!! many thanks………

    Reply
  5. Gloria James

    My favourite photo is the one with the cormorant on the dock. He looks like he is waiting for the boat to return!

    Reply

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