Cottontail Rabbit and Orchard Oriole: May 2021

Eastern cottontail rabbits occupy the shrubby areas of south-central United States, eastern Mexico, southern Canada, northernmost South America, eastern United States, and Central America.

Cottontail Rabbit

Studies show that cottontails consume as many as 145 different plants species.

Cottontail Rabbit

Cottontails remain active all year-round.

Cottontail Rabbit

MYSTERY BIRD

I will identify it at the end of the post.

Orchard Orioles are smaller than other orioles.

This year, I have seen many “1st summer” adult males.

Orchard Oriole (juvenile male)

Today at Col. Sam Smith Park I saw and heard several adult males.

Orchard Oriole (male)

They are a distinctive dark chestnut in colour quite unlike the bright orange of the male Baltimore Oriole.

Baltimore Oriole (male)

Orchard Orioles feed on insects, larvae, fruit and nectar in the mid to upper level of trees.

Orchard Oriole (male)
Orchard Oriole (male)
Orchard Oriole (male)
Orchard Oriole (male)

Other birds:

Double-crested Cormorant
Song Sparrow
Eastern Kingbird
Mallard (female)
Red-necked Grebe
Yellow Warbler
Ring-billed Gull
Ring-billed Gull
Double-crested Cormorants
Ring-billed Gull
Hooded Merganser (female)
Double-crested Cormorants
Eastern Kingbird
Ring-billed Gull
American Goldfinch (female)
Mallard (female)
Double-crested Cormorants

Some botany:

Leafy Spurge (Euphorbia virgata)
Choke Cherry (Prunus virginiana)
Red-osier (Cornus sericea)
Manitoba Maple (Acer negundo)
Gray Dogwood (Cornus foemina)
Serviceberry (Amelanchier)
Highbush-cranberry (Viburnum opulus)
Spittle Bug
Dame’s Rocket (Hesperis matronalis)
Dame’s Rocket (Hesperis matronalis)
Morrow Honeysuckle (Lonicera morrowii)
Apple (Malus)
Fragrant Sumac (Rhus aromatica)
Choke Cherry (Prunus virginiana)
Tartarian Honeysuckle (Lonicera tatarica )
Sandbar Willow (Salix exigua)
Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)
Black Maple (Acer nigrum)

MYSTERY BIRD

The long tail, cinnamon-buff below with a darker throat and blue-black above identify this as a Barn Swallow.

Barn Swallow

MAILBOX

Hi Miles This bird was just discovered outside our window. Do you recognize it? It has not moved for quite a while.

My response: It is either a Nighthawk or a Whip-Poor-Will. The two are almost identical. Hopefully it will recover and you can release it.

Later I got this message:

Thank you, and good news, the mystery visitor flew off after a hour or so. Cheers,

NATURE POETRY

Once upon a time there were
four little Rabbits, and their names
were–
      Flopsy,
            Mopsy,
                  Cotton-tail,
                        and Peter.

They lived with their Mother in a
sand-bank, underneath the root of a
very big fir-tree. – Beatrix Potter

Miles Hearn

2 thoughts on “Cottontail Rabbit and Orchard Oriole: May 2021

  1. Wendy Trueman

    Years ago I saw a bittern sitting atop a nearby chimney. He didn’t move for a couple of hours and I wondered what to do for him. But when I looked for him some time later, he’d taken off. I figured he’d been taking a much needed rest on his long migration north.

    Reply
  2. Lisa Volkov

    Yes, I love rabbits–sadly for them, they are almost a “feeder animal” in the food chain. The Spit (I still call it that) would be overrun with babies in early spring, and by the end of the winter–well, let’s just say the coyotes on the Spit were said to have gotten there because of them. Are some of the “new” birds being seen because of climate change? Nice pictures–as always. Glad the window sill story had a happy ending. Thanks, Miles!

    Reply

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