Ducklings at Lambton Woods: May 2021

Mallards can have two broods during the season and ducklings can number from 1 – 13 in each.

Mallard ducklings

Eggs are incubated for 23 – 30 days.

Mallard ducklings

These little down-covered ducklings are out of the nest in less than one day.

Mallard ducklings

 During the breeding season, Mallards eat mainly animal matter including aquatic insect larvae, earthworms, snails and freshwater shrimp.

Mallard ducklings

MYSTERY BIRD

I will identify it at the end of the post.

Migration certainly appears to be over, at least at Lambton Woods. I didn’t have a single migrating bird.

Here are the birds I was able to photograph:

Mallards
Canada Geese
Canada Goose
Double-crested Cormorants
Killdeer
Baltimore Oriole (male)
Baltimore Oriole (male)
Baltimore Oriole (male)

Views from Lambton Woods:

Some botany:

Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata)
Siberian Elm (Ulmus pumila)
Forget-me-not (Myosotis)
White Trillium (Trillium grandiflorum)
Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata)
Alternate-leaved Dogwood (Cornus alternifolia)
Lily of the Valley (Convallaria majalis)
Norway Maple (Acer platanoides)
Ostrich Fern
Skunk-cabbage (Symplocarpus foetidus)
Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)
Linden (Tilia cordata)
Virginia Waterleaf (Hydrophyllum virginianum)
Wild-ginger (Asarum canadense)
Wild Geranium (Geranium maculatum)
Winter Cress (Barbarea)
Wild Geranium (Geranium maculatum)
Winter Cress (Barbarea)
Spindletree (Euonymus europaea)
Black Currant (Ribes nigrum)
Red-osier (Cornus sericea)
Coltsfoot (Tussilago farfara)
Choke Cherry (Prunus virginiana)

MYSTERY BIRD

Despite the lack of gold colour this is a recently bathed female American Goldfinch.

American Goldfinch (female)

NATURE POETRY

May is bee in blossom,
May is birds a-nesting,
May is picking violets on a hill;
May is young and twenty,
May is Sunday-besting,
May is eager Jack and willing Jill.             – The Old Farmer’s Almanac, 1961

Miles Hearn

6 thoughts on “Ducklings at Lambton Woods: May 2021

  1. Lisa Volkov

    Looks very summery out there. I THOUGHT I recognized the mystery bird–which is to say, it looked FAMILIAR. But I couldn’t place it. I just knew it was something you had shown us before. I was right (at least about that!) The ducklings are adorable–of course. And the botany was very nice to see, as were the remaining birds. And finally–ta da! Skunk-cabbage! Thanks, Miles!

    Reply
  2. rosemarie fischer

    OOOHHH!!! those ducklings are so cute and big!!! and mr.& mrs. Mallard,strutting their stuff. also the beautiful wild flowers,so nice to see…..Thank You Miles…….

    ps: I like the Mystery Birds….but I still don’t too many right………..hmhmhm

    Reply
  3. rosemarie fischer

    OOOHHH!!! those ducklings are so cute and big!!! and mr.& mrs. Mallard,strutting their stuff. also the beautiful wild flowers,so nice to see…..Thank You Miles…….

    Reply
  4. Ruth

    Must be the season!! Saw wood ducklings at High Park and at least one family of red necked grebes had had their chicks –both seen on Monday of the past week, the latter at Colonel Sam Smith park

    The grebe chicks are still in the nest and are very tiny but striping can be seen even at a distance. The wood duckling are out swimming with Mom already.

    Reply
  5. Gloria James

    Do all elms have flower/seed parts similar to the Siberian elm? For two days this past we have had an accumulation of these whitish blossoms. When my husband was in the Keele/Dundas area he noticed the same blossoms floating in the air.

    Reply

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