Bloodroot and Other Early Spring Wildflowers: April 2021

Several days of steady rain had the East Don River quite swollen on this day at Seton Park:

Mallard (male)

All of that moisture helped to create several good displays of wildflowers:

Lesser Celandine (Ficaria verna)
Lesser Celandine (Ficaria verna)
Lesser Celandine (Ficaria verna)
Coltsfoot (Tussilago farfara)

Bloodroot usually has 8 petals but can have more.

Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadense)

It grows in rich forests in April and May

Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadense)

The name refers to the red sap found in the root and stem.

Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadense)

Other botany:

Linden (Tilia cordata)
Siberian Elm (Ulmus pumila)
Riverbank Grape (Vitis riparia)
Virginia Waterleaf (Hydrophyllum virginianum)
Norway Maple (Acer platanoides)
Norway Maple (Acer platanoides)
fallen Silver Maple flower on Buckthorn
Goutweed (Aegopodium podagraria)
Black Raspberry (Rubus occidentalis)
Buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica)
Bull Thistle (Cirsium vulgare)
Manitoba Maple (Acer negundo)
Manitoba Maple (Acer negundo)
Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica)
Cat-tail (Typha)
Silver Maple (Acer sachharinum)

MAILBOX

BABY OWLS 🦉

NATURE POETRY

April is here! Blithest season of all the year;
The little brook laughs as it leaps away;
The lambs are out on the hills at play.           – Eben E. Rexford (1848–1916) 

Miles Hearn

2 thoughts on “Bloodroot and Other Early Spring Wildflowers: April 2021

  1. John Bohdanowicz

    Very timely for me. I was at Forks Of The Credit Provincial Park two days ago and saw Bloodroot and Coltsfoot flowers.
    Very few birds though. It was eerily quiet that morning. One bluebird, a tree swallow a song sparrow, a red-tailed hawk, and possibly a nuthatch (flew away before I could get a good look at it).

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  2. Lisa Volkov

    What a pleasure it is to see such wonderful pictures of these earliest of wild flowers and other botanical beginnings! I’ve seen the Don flooded before, many times, and here it is again, very high, a roaring torrent. And the baby owls–what a wonderful addition. Thanks, Miles!

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