Carolina Wrens at a Foggy Guild Inn: September 26, 2020

It was a very foggy start to the day by the Guild Inn. Fog can be considered a type of low-lying cloud which often occurs near bodies of water.

Black-capped Chickadee

Gradually the fog lifted:

Today’s group:

Some botany and snails:

Amethyst Aster (Symphyotrichum amethystinum)
Amethyst Aster (Symphyotrichum amethystinum)
Amethyst Aster (Symphyotrichum amethystinum)
Heath Aster (Symphyotrichum ericoides)
New England Aster (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae)
New England Aster (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae) with bee
New England Aster (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae)
Evening-primrose (Oenothera)
Evening-primrose (Oenothera)
Spotted Knapweed (Centaurea stoebe)
Crown Vetch (Securigera varia)
Brown-lipped Snail
Brown-lipped Snail
Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina)
Heath Aster (Symphyotrichum ericoides)
Common Hawkweed (Hieracium vulgatum)
Cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium)
Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria)
Red-osier (Cornus sericea)
Canada Goldenrod (Solidago canadensis)
Missouri Willow (Salix eriocephala)
Multiflora Rose (Rosa multiflora)
Phragmites (Phragmites australis)
Indian-hemp (Apocynum cannabinum)

The Carolina Wren is found in much of the eastern United States. Southern Ontario, especially near Lake Ontario is as far north as they venture.

Carolina Wren

We heard two singing loudly this morning.

Carolina Wren

It is an unusual bird in that it does not migrate and I have heard them singing in every month of the year.

Carolina Wren

The song is notated as “tea kettle tea kettle tea kettle” or “richelieu richelieu richelieu”.

Carolina Wren

Diet consists insects and spiders. Food items like moths, stick bugs, caterpillars, beetles, grasshoppers, leafhoppers, cockroaches and crickets are their favorite foods. However, occasionally, they would also feast upon frogs, lizards, or snakes, as also herbivorous items like plant matter in a small amount. In winter, they consume seeds of poison ivy, bayberry, sweet gum, nuts and fruit pulps.

Carolina Wren

Once, while leading a walk at Rattray Marsh, we heard a Carolina Wren singing very close to us out in the open. Because of their small size and lack of movement while perched, it took 10 minutes before one of the 15 of us was able to locate its exact position. Since then I have considered myself very fortunate every time I spot one. The photos of this post were taken through a window into my back garden. The only time I have ever seen a Carolina Wren by the house.

Carolina Wren

Species list: Canada goose, ring-billed gull, killdeer, downy woodpecker, hairy woodpecker, blue jay, American crow, black-capped chickadee, red-breasted nuthatch, Carolina wren, gray catbird, American robin, northern cardinal, American goldfinch, white-throated sparrow. (15 species)

NATURE POETRY

September strews the woodlot o’er
With many a brilliant color;
The world is brighter than before,
Why should our hearts be duller?      – Thomas W. Parsons (1819–92) 

Miles Hearn

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1 thought on “Carolina Wrens at a Foggy Guild Inn: September 26, 2020

  1. Lisa Volkov

    I find that overcast conditions can enhance the appearance of fall colours, making them glow. And what terrific pictures you got of that Carolina Wren!

    Reply

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