A Walk at the Meadoway: September 2020

The Meadoway is the name given to a new initiative in Scarborough to revitalize the 500 acres and 16 linear kilometers of hydro corridor between the Don River Ravine and Rouge National Urban Park.

Native wildflowers and grasses have been seeded in the spring. This has created a marvellous meadow by September dominated by several tall sunflower and sunflower-like species.

Jerusalem-artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus)
Jerusalem-artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus)
Jerusalem-artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus)
Pale-leaved Sunflower (Helianthus decapetalus)
Pale-leaved Sunflower (Helianthus decapetalus)
Coreopsis (Coreopsis grandiflora)
Coreopsis (Coreopsis grandiflora)
Coreopsis (Coreopsis grandiflora)
Cabbage White Butterfly in Cup Plant
Cup Plant (Silphium perfoliatum)

Several tall grasses are also present.

Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardii)
Indian Grass (Sorghastrum nutans)
Switch Grass (Panicum virgatum)

Other botany:

Panicled Tick-trefoil (Desmodium paniculatum)
Panicled Tick-trefoil (Desmodium paniculatum)
Canada Thistle (Cirsium pratense)
Fragrant Sumac (Rhus aromatica)
Green Foxtail (Setaria viridis)
Evening-primrose (Oenothera)
European Mountain Ash (Sorbus acuparia)
Butterfly-weed (Asclepias tuberosa)
New England Aster (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae)
Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca)
Alfalfa (Medicago sativa)
Bull Thistle (Cirsium vulgare)
Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea)
Nannyberry (Viburnum lentago)
Purple-flowering Raspberry (Rubus odoratus)

I was surprised to find a large dogwood hedge with very large red berries:

Cornelian cherry dogwood (Cornus mas)

A little research tells me that this is Cornelian cherry dogwood, a plant native to Southern Europe and Southwestern Asia.

Cornelian cherry dogwood (Cornus mas)
Cornelian cherry dogwood (Cornus mas)
Cornelian cherry dogwood (Cornus mas)
Cornelian cherry dogwood (Cornus mas)

The edible berries are used for making jam. This robin was enjoying them.

American Robin
American Robin

Other fliers:

Mourning Dove
Cabbage White Butterfly
Monarch
Monarch
Monarch
Monarch
Red-legged Grasshopper
Milkweed Bug
Japanese Beetles
Japanese Beetles

NATURE POETRY

The luminous grasses, and the merry sun
In the grave sky; the sparkle far and wide,
Laughter of unseen children, cheerful chirp
Of crickets, and low lisp of ripping tide,
Light summer clouds fantastical as sleep
Changing unnoted while I gazed thereon.     – Emma Lazarus (1849–87) 

Miles Hearn

1 thought on “A Walk at the Meadoway: September 2020

  1. Lisa Volkov

    I love meadows. Hiking hydro corridors was a favorite pastime.
    Thanks for beautiful pictures, Miles. I wish I could hear the crickets!

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.