Himalayan Balsam at Taylor Massey Creek: August 2020

In the early 1800’s, Himalayan Balsam was introduced to many parts of Europe, New Zealand and North America as a garden ornamental.

Himalayan Balsam (Impatiens grandulifera)

Unfortunately it can completely dominate an area and crowd out native vegetation.

Himalayan Balsam (Impatiens grandulifera)

It is a prolific nectar producer, drawing pollinators away from surrounding native species.

Himalayan Balsam (Impatiens glandulifera)

Himalayan Balsam can aggressively replace native perennial plants along river banks, leading to soil erosion.

Himalayan Balsam (Impatiens grandulifera)

Another pink, but much less invasive plant growing here is Northern Willow-herb.

Northern Willow-herb (Epilobium glandulosum)
Northern Willow-herb (Epilobium glandulosum)
Northern Willow-herb (Epilobium glandulosum)
Northern Willow-herb (Epilobium glandulosum)

Other botany:

Hedge Parsley (Torilis japonica)
Hedge Parsley (Torilis japonica)
Yellow Avens (Geum aleppicum)
Bittersweet Nightshade (Solanum dulcmara)
Black Walnut (Juglans nigra)
Multiflora Rose (Rosa multiflora)
Narrow-leaved Cattail (Typha angustifolia)
Water Horehound (Lycopus americanus)
Spotted Jewelweed (Impatiens capensis)
Spotted Jewelweed (Impatiens capensis)
Wild-cucumber (Echinocystis lobata)
Wild-cucumber (Echinocystis lobata)
Great Chickweed (Cerastium pubera)
Hog-peanut (Amphicarpaea bracteata)
Hog-peanut (Amphicarpaea bracteata)
Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria)
Late Goldenrod (Solidago gigantea)
Hedge Bindweed (Calystegia sepium)
Dame’s Rocket (Hesperis matronalis)
Staghorn Sumac Aphid Galls

Nearby views:

American Crow

NATURE POETRY

A boy and his dad on a fishing-trip—
There is a glorious fellowship!
Father and son and the open sky
And the white clouds lazily drifting by.  – Edgar Guest (1881–1959) 

Miles Hearn

1 thought on “Himalayan Balsam at Taylor Massey Creek: August 2020

  1. Lisa Volkov

    Another very much loved place–and such beautiful botany! The (very stately and dignified) featured Crow (and one–bee?) is also very much appreciated. Thanks, Miles!

    Reply

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