Cloudywings, Satyrs and Skippers at High Park: June 2020

In summer, birds are much more difficult to find. While out for a walk in the Black Oak Savanna field at High Park, I had lots of fun photographing butterflies instead.

Northern Cloudywing

Northern Cloudywing

The Northern Cloudywing is the most common and broadly distributed Thorybes skipper in North America.

Northern Cloudywing

In the north, they fly between May and July.

Northern Cloudywing
Northern Cloudywing

Little Wood Satyr

Little Wood Satyr

Despite its name, the Little Wood Satyr is larger than most other small satyrs.

Little Wood Satyr
Little Wood Satyr

It is highly adaptable to moderate environmental change, requiring only that some woods, brush, grass and moisture remain to provide shelter and food.

Little Wood Satyr
Little Wood Satyr
Little Wood Satyr

European Skipper

European Skipper

It is not just plants such as Dandelions or birds such as Starlings which have arrived in North America from elsewhere. The European Skipper was introduced in London, Ontario in 1910.

European Skipper
European Skipper
European Skipper

The population of European Skippers fluctuates markedly. There were dozens in High Park on this day. They fly from June to August.

European Skipper
European Skipper
European Skipper
European Skipper

I also found this insect busily laying eggs.

Syrphid Fly

Syrphid Fly
Syrphid Fly
Syrphid Fly
Syrphid Fly

Thank-you to Ken Sproule for his assistance in butterfly and insect identification!

Some botany:

New Jersey Tea (Ceanothus americanus)
New Jersey Tea (Ceanothus americanus)
New Jersey Tea (Ceanothus americanus)
New Jersey Tea (Ceanothus americanus)
New Jersey Tea (Ceanothus americanus)
Bush-honeysuckle (Diervilla lonicera)
Bush-honeysuckle (Diervilla lonicera)
Bush-honeysuckle (Diervilla lonicera)
Bush-honeysuckle (Diervilla lonicera)
Black Oak (Quercus velutina)
Black Oak (Quercus velutina)
Black Oak (Quercus velutina)
Black Oak (Quercus velutina)
Riverbank Grape (Vitis riparia)
Riverbank Grape (Vitis riparia)
Poison Ivy (Toxicodendron rydbergii)
Poison Ivy (Toxicodendron rydbergii)
Yellow Hawkweed (Hieracium caespitosum)
Yellow Hawkweed (Hieracium caespitosum)
Goat’s beard (Tragopogon)
Goat’s beard (Tragopogon)
Panicled Tick-trefoil (Desmodium paniculatum)
Pointed Leaved Tick-trefoil (Hylodesmum glutinosum)
Motherwort (Leonurus cardiaca)
Prickly Sedge (Carex spicata)
Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca)
Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)
Freeman Maple emerging leaves
Red-osier (Cornus sericea)
Daisy Fleabane (Erigeron annuus)
Apple (Malus)
Blackberry (Prunus)
Multiflora Rose (Rosa multiflora)
Foxglove Beard-tongue (Penstemon digitalis)
Foxglove Beard-tongue (Penstemon digitalis)
Timothy (Phleum pratense)
Bittersweet Nightshade (Solanum dulcamara)
Black Cherry (Prunus serotina)
Pale Sunflower (Helianthus decapetalus)
Honeysuckle (Lonicera)
Common Buttercup (Ranunculus acris)
Cup Plant (Silphium perfoliatum)
Orchard Grass (Dactylis glomerata)
Red Clover (Trifolium pratense)
Spindle Tree (Euonymus europea)
Spittle Bug on Goldenrod
Red Fescue (Festuca rubra)
Red Ash (Fraxinus pensylvanica)
Yellow Avens (Geum aleppicum)
Dog-strangling Vine (Vincetoxicum rossicum)

Also seen:

Cottontail Bunny
Cottontail Bunny

NATURE POETRY

Now, from the thick grass, the fireflies begin to rise:
up, then down, then up again:
lit on the ascending flight,
drifting simultaneously to the same height,
exactly like the bubbles in champagne.          – Elizabeth Bishop (1911–79)

Miles Hearn

1 thought on “Cloudywings, Satyrs and Skippers at High Park: June 2020

  1. Lisa Volkov

    Wonderful to see them! And that fly! And the bunny! And the vine that looked like a creature! Great botany, too! Thanks again, Miles!

    Reply

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