They Really Have Golden Eyes: January 19, 2022

Common Goldeneyes winter on open lakes, rivers and bays in small flocks. During the breeding season they are far north of here.

I usually see them at a distance but, this morning at Marie Curtis Park, a few were close by in Etobicoke Creek diving for animal prey such as crustaceans, fish and mollusks.

It is obvious where the species names comes from.

Common Goldeneye (female)
Common Goldeneye (male)
Common Goldeneye (female)
Common Goldeneye (male)
Common Goldeneye (female)
Common Goldeneye (male)

Other birds:

Greater Scaup
Red-breasted Merganser (female)
Greater Scaup
Red-breasted Merganser (female)
Ring-billed Gulls
hybrid and Mallard (male)
Ring-billed Gulls
Red-breasted Merganser (female)
Ring-billed Gull
Hooded Merganser (male)
American Black Duck (male)
Ring-billed Gull
Mallards and Hooded Merganser (male)
affectionate Mallards
Ring-billed Gulls
Ring-billed Gulls
Bufflehead (male)
Hooded Merganser (male) and Mallard (female)
American Black Duck (male)
Mallards
Mallards and two hybrids

This morning’s group:

Park scenes:

Crack Willow (Salix fragilis)

NATURE POETRY

All day the gusty north-wind bore
The loosening drift its breath before;
Low circling round its southern zone,
The sun through dazzling snow-mist shone.     – John Greenleaf Whittier (1807–92)

Miles Hearn

2 thoughts on “They Really Have Golden Eyes: January 19, 2022

  1. Lisa Volkov

    I just love those winter ducks! And beautiful winter nature scenes, beautiful dawns, other birds–wonderful to see it here!

    Reply
  2. Susan

    so glad the golden eye has a golden eye. Now do tell me Miles where the black is that I should be noticing on the American black duck – above the tail? top of the head?
    Loving these close ups. It’s really helping me learn to ID them. Thank you as always for glorious photos which I look forward to every day.

    Reply

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