Coyote in the Guild Inn Parking Lot: September 25, 2021


The Eastern Coyote is a wild North American canine hybrid with both coyote and wolf parentage.

Eastern Coyote

Here is what is said about them at toronto.com:

Coyotes are a natural part of the urban landscape in Toronto and an important part of the ecosystem as they control rodent and rabbit populations in Toronto. These animals thrive in urban areas because of the abundance of food and shelter available to them.

I was able to get quite close to this individual at 8 am in the Guild Inn parking lot.

Eastern Coyote
Eastern Coyote
Eastern Coyote
Eastern Coyote
Eastern Coyote
Eastern Coyote
Eastern Coyote

The Guild Inn area is a wonderful mixture of woods, bluffs, lakefront and history:

summer Bank Swallow colony
Hornet’s nest
Greek theatre
from former Royal Conservatory of Music

There was even a kite flyer:

Today’s groups:

8 am


A few 11:30 am members arrived after I took the original photo so here are several photos of them. I thank the members who gave me permission to include their solo photos:

I was only able to photograph one bird:


Song Sparrow with dogwood berry

Species list: double-crested cormorant, red-tailed Hawk, Canada goose, ring-billed gull, hairy woodpecker, downy woodpecker, blue jay, common raven, black-capped chickadee, white-breasted nuthatch, American robin, gray catbird, European starling, house sparrow, common grackle, northern cardinal, American goldfinch, white-throated sparrow, song sparrow. (19 species)

Some botany:

Hawthorn (Crataegus)
Heart-leaved Aster (Symphyotrichum cordifolium)
New England Aster (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae)
Hog-peanut (Amphicarpaea bracteata)
Bittersweet Nightshade (Solanum dulcmara)
Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina)
Jerusalem Artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus)
Hawkweed (Hieracium murorum)
European Pussy Willow (Salix caprea)
Riverbank Grape (Vitis riparia)
Autumn-olive (Elaeagnus umbellata)

MAILBOX

Hello Miles,

Here are the photos I mentioned today…This egret was small and seemed junior. It was a privilege that he allowed me to watch from my kayak as he struggled to figure out how to swallow the huge catfish he caught. He repositioned his grip and dropped it over and over again. I felt motherly towards it and tried to encourage him to raise his head and stretch his neck:). I checked the time of my photos and calculated 29 minutes before he finally had his meal!Leah

NATURE POETRY

Again my fancy takes its flight, 
And soars away on thoughtful wing, 
Again my soul thrills with delight, 
And this the fancied theme, I sing, 
From Earthly scenes awhile, I find release, 
And dwell upon the restful Plains of Peace.           – Olivia Ward Bush-Banks (1869–1944)

Miles Hearn

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