Several Warblers and a Red-eye in My Backyard: September 2021

Usually my backyard birdfeeder is inundated with House Sparrows and it was this morning.

House Sparrows
House Sparrow (female_
House Sparrow (male)

The usual House Finches, Mourning Doves, Downy Woodpeckers, Squirrels and Chickadees were also there.

House Finch (female)
House Finch (female)
House Finch (female)
House Finch (female)
House Finch (female)
House Finch (male)
House Finch (male)
House Finch (male)
House Finch (male)
House Finch (female)
House Finch (female)
Mourning Dove
Downy Woodpecker (male)
Gray Squirrel
Black-capped Chickadee

I could see that a few migrating warblers were also in the yard.

The fall Blackburnian Warbler has a yellow throat and a dark cheek.

Blackburnian Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler

The Wilson’s Warbler shows what is left of a black cap.

Wilson’s Warbler

The fall Bay-breasted Warbler shows wing bars, breast streaks and a striped back.

Bay-breasted Warbler
Bay-breasted Warbler
Bay-breasted Warbler
Bay-breasted Warbler
Bay-breasted Warbler
Bay-breasted Warbler

My grandfather told me that Red-eyed Vireos are the most common forest bird in Ontario in the warm weather months. They continue to sing long after other species stop. Their nonstop singing has given them the nickname in the USA of the “preacher bird.”

Red-eyed Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo

NATURE POETRY

The maples stamped against the west
Were black and stately and full of rest,
And the hazy orange moon grew up
And slowly changed to yellow gold
While the hills were darkened, fold on fold
To a deeper blue than a flower could hold.           – Sara Teasdale (1884–1933)

Miles Hearn

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