Meadow Full of 6 Foot High Wildflowers: July 2021

There is a seldom visited natural area just north of the zoo which straddles the Little Rouge Creek:

It is so seldom used that I had difficulty finding the now overgrown path that leads to the meadow. Eventually I did and found myself surrounded by wildflowers just as tall or even taller than I am.

Joe-pye Weed – Joe Pye was a native medicine man who recommended this plant for whatever ails you.

Joe-pye-weed (Eutrochium maculatum)
Joe-pye-weed (Eutrochium maculatum)
Joe-pye-weed (Eutrochium maculatum)

Elecampane – a gorgeous sunflower-like plant which arrived here in the 19th century from central Eurasia.

Elecampane (Inula helenium)
Monarch on Elecampane
Elecampane (Inula helenium)
Elecampane (Inula helenium)

Boneset – The name boneset was derived from the plant’s use in the treatment of breakbone fever, a term describing the high fever that often accompanies influenza.

Boneset (Eupatorium perfoliatum)
Boneset (Eupatorium perfoliatum)
Boneset (Eupatorium perfoliatum)

Blue Vervain – One of my favourites!

Blue Vervain (Verbena hastata)
Blue Vervain (Verbena hastata)
Blue Vervain (Verbena hastata)

Water Hemlock –  Water hemlock can be deadly. It contains a toxin called cicutoxin, a violent convulsant, which acts as a stimulant in the central nervous system. Ingestion of hemlock can be fatal and symptoms can occur 15 minutes to 6 hours after the plant has been ingested.

Water-hemlock (Cicuta maculata) with Red Soldier Beetles
Water-hemlock (Cicuta maculata) with Red Soldier Beetles
Water-hemlock (Cicuta maculata) with Red Soldier Beetles
Water-hemlock (Cicuta maculata) with Red Soldier Beetles

MYSTERY PLANT

Other botany:

Chicory (Cichorium intybus)
Black Raspberry (Rubus occidentalis)
Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria)
Common Pear (Pyrus communis)
Common Buttercup (Ranunculus acris)
Grape leaf galls
Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)
Honeysuckle (Lonicera)
Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta)
Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)
Red Clover (Trifolium pratense)
Northern Willow-herb (Epilobium glandulosum)
Canada Anemone (Anemone canadensis)
Barber-pole Bulrush (Scirpus microcarpus)
Water Smartweed (Persicaria amphibia)
Ostrich Fern
Spinulose Wood Fern
Sensitive Fern
Spotted Jewelweed (Impatiens capensis)
Spotted Jewelweed (Impatiens capensis)
Agrimony (Agrimonia gryposepela)
Stickseed (Hackelia deflexa)
Nipplewort (Lapsana communis)
Blue Cohosh (Caulophyllum giganteum)
Enchanter’s-nightshade ( Circaea canadensis)
Orange Jelly

MYSTERY PLANT

This garden plant which commonly escapes into the wild has edible flowers. Orange Day-lily.

Orange Day-lily (Hemerocallis fulva)

MAILBOX

Quebecer hopes act of ‘horticultural disobedience’ will urge others to rethink lawns (msn.com)

NATURE POETRY

Deep in the greens of summer sing the lives
I’ve come to love. A vireo whets its bill.
The great day balances upon the leaves;
My ears can hear the bird when all is still.        – Theodore Roethke (1908–63) 

Miles Hearn

6 thoughts on “Meadow Full of 6 Foot High Wildflowers: July 2021

  1. Lisa Volkov

    I recognized the mystery plant!
    I believe I encountered these beautiful meadows on my very first attempt, many years ago, to find/access The Rouge with a hiking buddy. We took the bus to the zoo and got off somewhere that wasn’t clearly marked and didn’t seem very much visited–we had to struggle–and I believe this was where it was. These wild flowers and the pictures of them are gorgeous, and what you had to say about some of the plants was very informative. Thanks, Miles!

    Reply
  2. rosemarie fischer

    wonderful pictures! So many beautiful wild flowers,starting to recognize quite a few and I’m happy when I do…..it is so kind of you to share your vast knowledge of plants and birds with us,and I am eternally greatful
    for it,it’s like taking a Special Ed class in Nature. Thank you,Miles.

    Reply
  3. rosemarie fischer

    wonderful pics of so many beautiful wild flowers, who would know how many there are right here in our area…..thank you for sharing your vast knowledge of plants and birds with us. Your posts feel like taking a Special ED class in Nature Appreciation, Miles, and I can’t Thank You enough for this. THANKS!!!!!!

    Reply
  4. Gert Trudel

    Hi Miles,
    Thank you for the field trip….again. I am surprised at how many I am beginning to recognize. Still have trouble with ferns and TREES! Most green berries still look like grapes to me!! But will get there as my eyes begin to pick out that one thing about them that makes them different. ( like sparrows) Thank you…oh, I just discovered that when I click onto a picture it opens separately and then the – and + zoom appears . WOW. What depth!

    Reply
  5. Gloria James

    My favourite wildflower of the group is the elecampane, but they are all beautiful. Several years ago purple loosestrife was considered to be invasive and a threat to other water plants. The concern about the plant seems to have subsided. Thanks for the photos. Those orange day lilies are very common in the Haliburton area.

    Reply

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