My First Use of a Long Lens: January 2021

With all of the photographs that I take daily, I took the plunge and rented a professional class mirrorless camera and long lens (the type that sports and wildlife photographers use) for a week.

On this day, I returned to the waters under the Burlington Skyway knowing that there would be many birds.

At first, I thought that the weight of the set-up would be a problem but it really wasn’t.

Here are some of the photos:

Canada Geese
Rock Pigeons
Long-tailed Ducks (female)
Long-tailed Ducks (female)
Herring Gull
Herring Gull
Long-tailed Ducks
White-winged Scoter (female)
Herring Gull
Red-breasted Merganser (female)
Long-tailed Duck (female) and Red-breasted Merganser (male)
Long-tailed Ducks (male)
Long-tailed Ducks and White-winged Scoter (female)
White-winged Scoter (female)
Common Goldeneye (juvenile)
Long-tailed Duck (female)
Long-tailed Duck (female)
Herring Gull
White-winged Scoters
Long-tailed Ducks (male)
Common Goldeneye (female) and White-winged Scoter (female)
Trumpeter Swan
Red-breasted Merganser (female)
Long-tailed Duck (male)
Long-tailed Ducks
Canada Goose
Herring Gull

The camera easily finds and tracks flying birds:

Canada Geese
Canada Geese
Long-tailed Ducks (male)
Long-tailed Ducks
Long-tailed Ducks
Long-tailed Ducks (male)
Long-tailed Ducks
Long-tailed Ducks (male)

Imagine my horror on arriving at home to discover the my “Lightroom” photo processing system would not allow me to import my 400 photos.

After 2 hours of looking at every You Tube video on the subject, I finally realized that I needed to update the Lightroom programme which I did. Phew!!

NATURE POETRY

Throughout the afternoon I watched them there,
Snow-fairies falling, falling from the sky,
Whirling fantastic in the misty air,
Contending fierce for space supremacy.        – Claude McKay (1889–1948)

Miles Hearn

10 thoughts on “My First Use of a Long Lens: January 2021

  1. Brian Whitefield

    Looking at my previous comment, I find it regrettable that English doesn’t have a separate word for ‘landing’ on water. French has ‘amerrir’ vs. ‘atterrir’ (literally ‘ to sea’ in English), German, ‘wassern’ vs. ‘landen’ and Spanish ‘amerrizar vs. ‘aterrizar’. Some say the closest way of replicating the distinction in English is to use ‘slashdown’ rather than ‘land.’ Heck, French even has a separate verb to ‘land’ on the moon – ‘alunir’ being much more precise than ‘ lunar landing.’

    Reply
  2. Patricia Lund

    Great to see the ducks coming in for a ‘splashdown’: you never know when a wordsmith might read one’s comment. I can sense your excitement Miles with your new experiment and it really seems worthwhile with filming their flight. Impressive.
    Interesting comments from Brian.

    Reply
  3. Susan

    Thank you Miles – Good on you for giving this a try. Loved all the birds in flight photos especially the landing
    long-tail. You have shown us some wonderful birds in flight close ups in former blogs which I like so much as we see the wings so well stopped in flight which we can’t see normally. This was so informative.

    Reply
  4. Gloria James

    So glad you were able to successfully update your Lightroom program. All the photos are so clear and show so much detail on the birds. To me the most impressive is the ability of the geese to cruise with such ease around the steel girders of the bridge.

    Reply
  5. Lisa Volkov

    Yes! Thank goodness! And obviously well worth it! I’ll bet the next thing will be your investing in one of these!
    Wonderful pictures, Miles. Thanks!

    Reply

Leave a Reply to Susan Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *