Scoters under the Burlington Skyway: January 2021

White-winged Scoters breed on large lakes in northwestern North America. Most move to the ocean or coastal bays in winter but a few spend the winter on Lake Ontario.

White-winged Scoter (female)

White-winged Scoters feed chiefly on mollusks which they collect from mussel beds and depths of 15 – 25 feet.

White-winged Scoter (female)

Unlike most diving ducks which propel themselves underwater with their feet, scoters may also use their wings.

White-winged Scoters

In Europe they are known as the Velvet Scoter.

White-winged Scoter (female)
White-winged Scoter (female)
White-winged Scoters
White-winged Scoters (female)
White-winged Scoter (female)
Long-tailed Duck (male) and White-winged Scoter (female)
White-winged Scoter (male)
White-winged Scoter (male)
Long-tailed Ducks and White-winged Scoter

Some other birds:

Trumpeter Swans (gray are juveniles)
Trumpeter Swan (juvenile)
Trumpeter Swans (gray are juveniles)
Trumpeter Swans (gray are juveniles)
Canada Geese
Canada Geese
Red-tailed Hawk
Mourning Doves
Rock Pigeon
Rock Pigeons
Northern Mockingbird
Northern Mockingbird
Northern Mockingbird

The first bridge of the Burlington Skyway was completed in 1958 with a second added in 1985.

I remember as a child before the Skyway construction, waiting for hours in the car as a ship entered or left Hamilton Harbour which stopped traffic as the lift bridge went up.

NATURE POETRY

The icicles now fringe the trees

That swayed in summer’s gentle breeze,
When summer days were fair.                 – Dora Read Goodale (1866–1915)

Miles Hearn

1 thought on “Scoters under the Burlington Skyway: January 2021

  1. Lisa Volkov

    I love the ducks of winter, and the information about the White-winged Scoters was fascinating. I enjoyed the other birds too, and the Burlington Skyway bridge (which I have gone over in a car) was very interesting to see and read about.
    Thanks, Mile!

    Reply

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