a Snowy Glendon Forest: December 2020

I have been to Glendon Forest many, many times but have never seen it as it looked on this day:

The forest is located in Sunnybrook Park just next to the former stables which burned down a few years ago:

former barn
former staff residence for stables

Some botany:

Spindletree (Euonymus europaea)
White Birch (Betula papyfifera)
Crack Willow (Salix fragilis)
Black Alder (Alnus glutinosa)
Basswood (Tilia americana)
Black Knot Gall
Winged Euonymus (Euonymus alata)
Japanese Yew (Taxus cuspidata)
Black Walnut (Juglans nigra)
Buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica)
Red Oak (Quercus rubra)
Sensitive Fern fertile frond
White Pine (Pinus strobus)
Common Hoptree (Ptelea trifoliata)
Common Hoptree (Ptelea trifoliata)
Common Hoptree (Ptelea trifoliata)

En route here. I encountered 100’s of Starlings congregating near hydro lines:

Murmuration of Starlings
Murmuration of Starlings
Murmuration of Starlings
Murmuration of Starlings
Murmuration of Starlings

Starlings were introduced to New York City in the late 1890’s because they are mentioned in Shakespeare’s Henry 1V Part 1:

In the play, Hotspur is contemplating driving King Henry insane by having a starling repeat the name of Hotspur’s brother-in-law Mortimer, whom Henry refuses to ransom out of prisoner status. “Nay, I’ll have a starling shall be taught to speak nothing but ‘Mortimer’, ” Hotspur whines.

Miles Hearn

4 thoughts on “a Snowy Glendon Forest: December 2020

  1. Marilyn Bunker

    So beautiful. Loved the whimsical Christmas ornaments hung in all of nature’s wonder.
    Wishing you and your family a healthy and happy new year.
    Peace, Marilyn

    Reply
  2. Loretta Guran

    These pictures are delightful. I always try to see how many species I can recognize. I loved the glass ornament photo.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.