Affectionate Ravens at the Bluffs: October 29, 2020

It is probably not a good idea to attribute human emotions to birds (“anthropomorphism”).

Common Ravens

However, all of us who saw the tender motions of these two ravens this morning are tempted to do it.

Common Ravens
Common Ravens
Common Ravens

They spent a considerable amount of time together:

Common Ravens
Common Ravens

Flying closely together is common among “courting” birds:

Common Ravens
Common Ravens

Some time was spent apart:

Common Raven
Common Raven
Common Raven
Common Raven
Common Raven
Common Raven

and there was some coming and going:

Common Ravens
Common Ravens
Common Ravens

A nearby Sharp-shinned Hawk (these are about Blue Jay size) was showing interest in the raven couple:

Sharp-shinned Hawk
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Raven and Sharp-shinned Hawk
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Raven and Sharp-shinned Hawk
Sharp-shinned Hawk

Other birds:

Ring-billed Gull
Ring-billed Gulls
Herring Gull (juvenile)
Herring Gull (juvenile)
Herring Gull (juvenile)
Mallard (female)
Hybrid “Bib” duck with Mallard (male)
Cooper’s Hawk
Trumpeter Swan
Canada Geese
Canada Geese
Northern Cardinal (male)
Northern Cardinal (male)
American Robins
American Robin
American Robin
Rock Pigeons
Hairy Woodpecker (male)
Golden-crowned Kinglet

Species list: trumpeter swan, Canada goose, mallard, red-breasted merganser, sharp-shinned hawk, Cooper’s hawk, turkey vulture, ring-billed gull, herring gull, mourning dove, rock pigeon, hairy woodpecker, blue jay, common raven, black-capped chickadee, European starling, American robin, Swainson’s thrush, golden-crowned kinglet, house sparrow, northern cardinal, American goldfinch.  (22 species)

Park views:

Black Walnut
Raccoon
Squirrel with walnut
Red Fox

Today’s group:

a neighbour invited us to have a look at her garden

NATURE POETRY

The hollow winds begin to blow,  
The clouds look black, the glass is low;  
The soot falls down, the spaniels sleep,  
And spiders from their cobwebs peep.     – Dr. Edward Jenner (1749–1823)

Miles Hearn


4 thoughts on “Affectionate Ravens at the Bluffs: October 29, 2020

  1. Lisa Volkov

    Well, I couldn’t help thinking , “awww”, until the Hawk appeared, when I went “oh oh!” Except that I did figure that the Ravens were probably too big to be prey for the Hawk. Great pictures, and of course, it’s always wonderful to see the Beautiful Bluffs!

    Reply
  2. rosemarie fischer

    thanks for the beautiful pictures,Miles….you really hit the jackpot today….must have been great to see all those birds….

    Reply
  3. Mary Rose Cowan

    Aside from the danger of interfering,
    domesticating and encroaching their natural habitats, why are we so hesitant to anthropomorphize
    other species? Scientific pursuits must beware, but painters, writers, poets, photographers and others have immortalized their beauty for a long time. With our eternal gratitude.
    (All non-human species surely have their own anthropomorphic equivalent interpretation of other species too.)
    If it fosters kinship with all species I really think it’s a good practice.

    I look forward to your posts, especially now, and grateful for your generosity
    of spirit.

    of humans

    Thank you for your

    Reply
  4. Gloria James

    I agree with Mary’s comment. The aboriginal people believed animals had spirits and attributed human characteristics to them. Also Dr. Suzuki has shown that animals have feelings (fear,affection,contentment) in his studies of mammals and birds. Some humans use the excuse that a different species is not capable of feelings and consider themselves justified to treat animals in a callous manner.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.