Joe-pye-weed by Duffins Creek: August 2020

Joe-pye-weed (Eutrochium maculatum)

There are a few ideas on the origin of the name of this lovely plant which is found in so many wettish habitats.

 The most prevalent theory holds that it refers to a Native American named Joe Pye (Jopi), who used this perennial plant to cure typhus in the 1800’s.

Joe-pye-weed (Eutrochium maculatum)

Joe-pye-weed is in full flower in early August and it was during my visit to Duffins Creek.

Joe-pye-weed (Eutrochium maculatum)
Joe-pye-weed (Eutrochium maculatum)
Joe-pye-weed (Eutrochium maculatum)

Joe-pye-weed is a robust plant 3 – 10 feet in height.

Joe-pye-weed (Eutrochium maculatum)
Joe-pye-weed (Eutrochium maculatum)

Leaves are in whorls of 3 – 7:

Joe-pye-weed (Eutrochium maculatum)

Other botany:

Poison Ivy (Toxicodendron rydbergii)
Poison Ivy (Toxicodendron rydbergii)
Poison Ivy (Toxicodendron rydbergii)
Deptford Pink (Dianthus armeria)
Pale-leaved Sunflower (Helianthus decapetalus)
Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta)
Water-hemlock (Cicuta maculata) considered to be the most violently poisonous plant in temperate North America for both livestock and humans.
Water-hemlock (Cicuta maculata)
Tartarian Honeysuckle (Lonicera tatarica)
White Snakeroot (Ageratina altissima)
White Snakeroot (Ageratina altissima)
Enchanter’s-nightshade (Circaea canadensis)
Heal-all (Prunella vulgaris)
Inky Cap Mushrooms (Thank-you to Eugene Knapik for identification)
Panicled Tick-trefoil (Desmodium paniculatum)
Panicled Tick-trefoil (Desmodium paniculatum)
Lopseed (Phryma leptostachya)
St. John’s-wort (Hypericum perforatum)
Heart-leaved Aster (Symphyotrichum cordifolium))
Michigan Lily (Lillium michiganese)
Creeping Bellflower (Campanula rapunculoides)
Evening-primrose (Oenothera)
Virgin’s-bower (Clematis virginiana)
Queen-Anne’s-lace (Daucus carota)
Autumn-olive (Elaeagnus umbellata)
Yarrow (Achillea millefolia)
Bur-reed
Bur-reed
Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria)
Birdfoot Trefoil (Lotus corniculatis)
Boneset (Eupatorium perfoliatum)
Pine Cone Willow Gall
Soapwort (Saponaria officinalis)
White Sweet-clover (Melilotus alba)
Wild-bergamot (Monarda fistulosa)
Rose Hip
Indian-hemp (Apocynum cannabinum)

After considerable rain over night, Duffins Creek was quite swollen on this day:

Other views:

Dogbane Beetle (Thanks to Ken Sproule for identification)
Asian Ladybug (Thanks to Ken Sproule for identification)

NATURE POETRY

How pleasant the lives of the birds must be,
Living in love in a leafy tree!
And, away through the air, what joy to go;
And to look on the green, bright earth below.     – Mary Howitt (1799–1888) 

Miles Hearn

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