100 Metres Along a Creek: Summer 2020

During my working years, I used to lament that the seasons were passing by and I was taking little notice of them. Suddenly the snow fell, or leaves burnished with colour and I barely noticed. Starting on March 16 this year, I decided to go out into nature every day and explore and learn. This report marks my 107th straight day of doing so and a dream is coming alive.

For some of these posts, I have walked as far as 8 kms. On this day, I found more than enough to photograph along a 100 metre section of a stream near Lawrence and Bayview.

Once again, thank-you to Ken Sproule for his assistance in creature identification.

Cabbage White Butterfly
Cabbage White Butterfly
Cabbage White Butterfly
Cabbage White Butterfly
Bee
Bee
Bee
European Skipper
European Skipper
European Skipper
European Skipper
European Skipper
Seven-spotted Ladybug
Twelve-spotted Skimmer. 8 white spots interspersed between the 12 dark spots show that this is a male.
Twelve-spotted Skimmer.  8 white spots interspersed between the 12 dark spots show that this is a male.
Ebony Jewelwing (female) Females have a white spot on the wings
Ebony Jewelwing (female) Females have a white spot on the wings
Ebony Jewelwing (female) Females have a white spot on the wings
Silver-spotted Skipper
Silver-spotted Skipper
Silver-spotted Skipper
Silver-spotted Skipper
Silver-spotted Skipper

Some botany:

Path Rush (Juncus tenuis)
Canada Rush (Juncus canadensis)
Indian-strawberry (Potentilla indica)
Spindle Tree (Euonymus europea)
Poison Ivy (Toxicodendron rydbergii)
Indian-hemp (Apocynum cannabinum)
St. John’s-wort (Hypericum perforatum)
Dwarf St. John’s-wort (Hypericum mutilum)
Softstem Bulrush (Scirpus validus)
Fowl Meadow Grass (Poa palustris)
Apple (Malus)
White Clover (Trifolium repens)
Forget-me-not (Myosotis arvensis)
Heal-all (Prunella vulgaris)
Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus inserta)
Queen-Anne’s-lace (Daucus carota)
Queen-Anne’s-lace (Daucus carota)
Field Sow-thistle (Sonchus arvensis)
Curly Dock (Rumex crispus)
Canada Thistle (Cirsium arvense)
Chamomile (Anthemis arvensis)
Moneywort (Lysimachia nummularia)
Cat-tail with male flowers above female flowers
Birdfoot Trefoil (Lotus corniculatis)
Teasel (Dipsacus fullonum)

A Song Sparrow serenaded me during my entire visit singing about 4 times a minute for an hour. (approx. 250 songs!)

Song Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Song Sparrow

NATURE POETRY

Hot July brings cooling showers,
Apricots, and gillyflowers.        – Sara Coleridge (1802–52)

Miles Hearn

5 thoughts on “100 Metres Along a Creek: Summer 2020

  1. Joyce Sparks

    I do so enjoy your outings Miles. Every day has made the tediousness of the pandemic easier to tolerate. Nature is outstanding and even more exciting if we take the time to check it out closely.

    Reply
  2. Lynn Blaxley

    Look forward to your amazing daily photos! Greatly enjoying your inclusion of butterflies and other insects.

    Reply
  3. Gert Trudel

    My husband walks every morning and every so often he brings me a bouquet of wildflowers . Since I have ‘really gotten’ into your posts I am earnestly trying to identify each one in the bouquets. This morning I was pretty good at it too!!!! Impressed my husband!! ( only 2 are giving me a bit of a challenge, but I’ll get them).
    I notice that now when I go for a little drive ..it is taking me little longer to get home!!! Thank you Miles for taking all that time to post your pictures.

    Reply
  4. Patricia Lund

    You are remarkable for never flagging with all your walks and never taking a day off. I realize that I could have done more walking and exploring and feel a bit lazy. I do appreciate your nature walks and have learnt some new names of plants and birds which makes me study and appreciate them more.
    Thank you Miles.

    Reply

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