Red-tailed Hawk & New Jersey Tea at High Park / October 9, 2019

Every autumn, a group of volunteers scan the skies for migrating hawks, eagles and vultures at High Park. The park also has a few year-round resident Red-tailed Hawks and we saw one today on this 11 degree sunny morning.

Red-tailed Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk

Species list: mallard, wood duck, red-tailed hawk, ring-billed gull, northern flicker, hairy woodpecker, downy woodpecker, eastern phoebe, blue jay, American crow, black-capped chickadee, white-breasted nuthatch, red-breasted nuthatch, American robin, ruby-crowned kinglet, house sparrow, northern cardinal, American goldfinch, white-crowned sparrow, song sparrow.  (20 species)

House Sparrow (female)
Northern Flicker (male) eating Dogwood berries
Northern Flicker (male) eating Dogwood berries
Wood Duck (juvenile male)

Park scenes:

After the Boston Tea Party in 1773, the British no longer shipped Chinese tea to their American colonies. Colonists found that the leaves from a shrub named “Redroot” produced an acceptable tea. Eventually this tea caught on and the plant’s name became New jersey Tea. The High Park Black Oak Savanna is a perfect habitat for this plant.

New Jersey Tea (Ceanothus americana)
New Jersey Tea (Ceanothus americana)
New Jersey Tea (Ceanothus americana)
New Jersey Tea (Ceanothus americana)

Other botany:

Panicled Aster (Symphyotrichum lanceoltum)
Figwort (Scrophularia lanceolta)
Queen Anne’s-lace (Daucus carota)
Sky-blue Aster (Symphyotrichum oolentangiense)
Turkey Tails
Birch Polypore
Birch Polypore
Baby’s Bottom Slime
Resupinate Fungus

This morning’s group:

NATURE POETRY

Hedge-crickets sing; and now with treble soft
The red-breast whistles from a garden-croft;
And gathering swallows twitter in the skies       – John Keats (1795–1821)

Miles Hearn

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.