Cliffs of Moher and Lahinch: Ireland

Cliffs of Moher

The cliffs are between 100 and 200 metres in height.

Cliffs of Moher

They run for about 14 kilometres.

Cliffs of Moher

The cliffs are one of the most visited tourist sites in Ireland.

Cliffs of Moher

You can see them from the sea.

Cliffs of Moher

The cliffs are made up of Namurian shale and sandstone.

Cliffs of Moher

We were too late in the breeding season to see razorbills or puffins but many Northern Fulmars were present.

Northern Fulmar

Fulmars are tubenoses just like Albatross. I saw many Southern Fulmars following ships and nesting in cliffs in Antarctica.

Northern Fulmar

Grazing at the Cliffs of Moher

There is an old saying that Ireland would be a wonderful place to live if you could put a roof on it. All of this rain does lead to a good variety of healthy wildflowers.

One of the most common in August is Common Ragwort.

Common Ragwort (Senicio jacobaea)

Common Ragwort (Senicio jacobaea)

Another is a plant that also grows in North America; Bull Thistle. In Ireland the common name is Spear Thistle.

Spear Thistle (Cirsium vulgare)

Spear Thistle (Cirsium vulgare)

                                                                LAHINCH

 

Lahinch beach

Lahinch is just south of the Cliffs of Moher and the cliffs can be seen in the distance. It is known for its surfing. The 1972 European Surfing Finals were held here.

Lahinch

Lahinch

The beach is over 2 kilometres in length and is very popular despite temperatures which rarely rise above 20 degrees. It was lightly raining on this day. Many of the children wear wetsuits in order to keep warm.

Lahinch

The Irish sport of hurling can be seen everywhere.

Hurling

Hurling

Starlings, which were introduced into North America in the late 19th century, are native to Ireland and Northern Europe. They are in Ireland year round. The ones that I saw were already in winter plumage in August.

Here are some common Irish birds seen at Lahinch:

Starling

Rook

Black-headed Gull

Black-headed Gull

Lahinch beach

Miles Hearn

 

 

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