Pileated Woodpecker at Col Danforth Park

photo: Ken Sproule

photo: Ken Sproule

On a late February day, we were enjoying the beautiful trail that follows Highland Creek.

 

photo: Ken Sproule

photo: Ken Sproule

The group was alerted to the presence of a pileated woodpecker by the loud, rising and falling call. We also heard a continuous almost barking sound which I had never heard before.

photo: Ken Sproule

photo: Ken Sproule

Happily Ken Sproule was able to get these wonderful, close-up photos.

photo: Ken Sproule

photo: Ken Sproule

Small woodlots are not large enough for these big birds: they require at least 100 acres of forest.

photo: Ken Sproule

photo: Ken Sproule

Our bird is a male as you see by the red “mustache” marks.

photo: Ken Sproule

photo: Ken Sproule

They make large holes in a very short time in their search for insect larvae and other food.

photo: Ken Sproule

photo: Ken Sproule

photo: Ken Sproule

photo: Ken Sproule

The word “pileated” comes from “pileus” which was a pointed or close-fitting cap worn by ancient Romans. The word can be pronounced as either  “pylius” or “pillius.”

photo; Ken Sproule

photo; Ken Sproule

Miles Hearn

2 thoughts on “Pileated Woodpecker at Col Danforth Park

  1. Lisa Volkov

    Miles, you simply insist (italics) on grossing me out. Their tongues do– (italics) what? Go– (italics) where? Around, to…?
    Well, that is certainly (gag) fascinating (italics). Seriously! How could you leave It (the tongue)–out?
    Beautiful pictures of another place I love (and miss), just before spring awakening. Thanks, Miles–and thank you too, Ken–for all the wonderful/beautiful pictures!
    P.S. (I sure wish I knew how to make italics happen, here. All capitals seemed like too much. But yes–italics (in italics).

    Reply

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